Author Archives: Brent

About Brent

Assistant Professor of Computer Science at Hendrix College. Functional programmer, mathematician, teacher, pianist, follower of Jesus.

A few words about PWW #25

In my previous post I made images like this: What’s going on? Well, first, it’s easy to notice that each grid starts with in the upper-left square; is one square down and to the right of , then is one … Continue reading

Posted in modular arithmetic, number theory, posts without words | Tagged , , , , | 4 Comments

Post without words #25

Image | Posted on | Tagged | 4 Comments

Goldilogs and the n bears

Once upon a time there was a girl named Goldilogs. As she was walking through the woods one day, she came upon a curious, long house. Walking all round it and seeing no one at home, she tried the door … Continue reading

Posted in computation, humor | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

Finding the repetend length of a decimal expansion

We’re still trying to find the prefix length and repetend length of the decimal expansion of a fraction , that is, the length of the part before it starts repeating, and the length of the repeating part. In my previous … Continue reading

Posted in computation, group theory, modular arithmetic, number theory, pattern | Tagged , , , , , ,

Finding the prefix length of a decimal expansion

Remember from my previous post that we’re trying to find the prefix length and repetend length of the decimal expansion of a fraction , that is, the length of the part before it starts repeating, and the length of the … Continue reading

Posted in number theory, pattern | Tagged , , , , | 3 Comments

Finding prefix and repetend length

We interrupt your regularly scheduled primality testing to bring you something else fun I’ve been thinking about. It’s well-known that any rational number has a decimal expansion that either terminates, or is eventually periodic—that is, the digits after the decimal … Continue reading

Posted in number theory, pattern | Tagged , , , | 2 Comments

More on Fermat witnesses and liars

In my previous post I stated, without proof, the following theorem: Theorem: if is composite and there exists at least one Fermat witness for , then at least half of the numbers relatively prime to are Fermat witnesses. Were you … Continue reading

Posted in computation, number theory, primes | Tagged , , , , ,